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Make Bee Bombs to Help Develop Pollinator Habitats

Duration

30-Minutes or Less

Directions

Find the best route

How Often Is This Offered?

Monthly

Age Range

  • K - 2nd
  • 3rd - 5th
  • 6th - 8th
  • High School

Help Required

Adult

Description

Seedles, or little seed "bombs" made of kitty litter, potting soil, and seeds that gardeners can plant literally anywhere. Whether thrown onto the banks of a river or deposited alongside a mountain trail, the colorful eggs are meant to grow into beautiful flowers that will help bees thrive.

What's Needed To Complete

A bucket or large bowl for mixing ingredients -1 part wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) -3 parts compost or potting soil compost mix -3 parts cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) -2 parts water A large bowl for mixing ingredients A bucket or large bowl for mixing ingredients -1 part wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) -3 parts compost or potting soil compost mix -3 parts cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) -2 parts water ½ cup wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) A bucket or large bowl for mixing ingredients -1 part wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) -3 parts compost or potting soil compost mix -3 parts cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) -2 parts water 1.5 cups compost or potting soil compost mix A bucket or large bowl for mixing ingredients -1 part wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'lll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) -3 parts compost or potting soil compost mix -3 parts cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) -2 parts water -1.5 cups cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) A bucket or large bowl for mixing ingredients -1 part wildflower seeds (wildflowers that are local and native to the area they'll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species) -3 parts compost or potting soil compost mix -3 parts cat litter (Eco Cane Natural Clumping Cat Litter is a good one, but others can be used) -2 parts water 1 cups water A tray or flat cardboard on which to let the seed bombs dry and harden. This will yield approximately 20 golf-ball sized bee bombs. You can decrease or increase based on how many people you have creating these seedles!

Whose Help Is Required

Some help finding the right ingredients.

Special Requirements

None

How It Makes A Difference

By helping develop pollinator habitats, you are helping bees thrive, which in turn support food and flower gardens that feed people! Growing a patch of colorful native wildflowers not only adds beauty and charm to your space, but they provide many benefits to the world around us. Wildflowers are native to the area where they grow, meaning they™re conditioned to thrive there. They require less water and fertilizer, are less prone to disease and are more tolerant to pests. They also provide critical habitat for pollinators and beneficial insects and wildlife, which is important for ecosystem function and pollination. Wildflowers can also improve soil health, prevent erosion, improve water quality, increase yields and enhance forage conditions for livestock. When choosing seeds to use in your seed bombs, make sure you use wildflowers that are local and native to the area they™ll be planted to avoid introducing invasive species.

Where to Serve

From Home/Anywhere*

Instructions

Gather or purchase the materials needed. Mix together cat litter and potting soil. Add your wildflower seeds to the soil mixture (we also added some sunflower seeds). Be sure to only use seeds that are native to your area and not invasive. Native plants will grow better and support more wildlife than non-native species. Not all of the seeds will sprout, so it's best to have an assortment of flower species and varieties. Add a little bit of water at a time and squish with your hands until everything is mixed and about the consistency of thick cookie dough. Make sure not to use too much water or it gets gooey and runny. If you use too much water, add more soil. Once everything is well mixed, roll the mixture into balls about the size of a golf ball. Set them on a tray and let them dry completely until hardened. This may take a couple hours or a couple days, depending on humidity levels where you live. Once dry, package your seed bombs in small envelopes or bags to gift to friends, neighbors, teachers or family members. They'd make great gifts for Earth Day, Mother's Day, Valentine's Day, Christmas, Teacher Appreciation or just because. Or simply put in an abandoned lot, your yard or in a meadow! If storing your seed bombs to gift or use at a later date, just be sure to keep them in a cool, dry, dark location to prevent them from germinating.

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